Open navigation

Emergency preparedness

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services requires providers to develop emergency preparedness plans

On September 16, 2016 CMS published a final rule requiring 17 of the provider types governed under Medicare and Medicaid programs to establish a comprehensive emergency preparedness plan. The regulations will be in effect on November 15, 2016 and the implementation date will be one year later - November 15, 2017. The two major topics covered in the regulation concern development of an emergency preparedness program and specialized provisions dealing with emergency and backup power supplies for certain health care facilities.

A major component of this rule is that hospitals, transplant centers, critical access hospitals and long term care facilities must carefully evaluate their emergency and standby power systems. Specifically, these systems must be designed, installed, inspected, tested, and maintained in accordance with the 2010 edition of NFPA 110, Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems, as well as both NFPA 99 and NFPA 101, 2012 editions.

The CMS announcement about the emergency preparedness rule will require a coordinated set of requirements to be established by the various providers governed under the rule. The emergency preparedness spectrum extends to the public who rely on the various organizations that provide different levels of medical and social wellness care as well as to the staff and physical plant assets that are part of the delivery system.

Free tool: While the rule is quite comprehensive, there are essentially six topical areas that apply to some or all of the 17 provider types under the rule. NFPA offers this guide to help users understand which of the six areas apply to what provider type along with a link back to the final rule to provide more detail. This resource has been designed primarily as an educational and convenience tool to allow those impacted by the changes to gain familiarity with CMS expectations and requirements.