Escape planning

Create a home escape plan
Develop and practice a home fire escape plan using NFPA's home escape plan grid (PDF, 1.1 MB).

Safety Tip

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the alarm sounds. Read all of NFPA's escape planning tips and download our free safety tip sheet.

Escape grid

Your ability to get out depends on advance warning from smoke alarms and advance planning.

In 2014, there were an estimated 367,500 reported home structure fires and 2,745 associated civilian deaths in the United States.

Fire can spread rapidly through your home, leaving you as little as one or two minutes to escape safely once the alarm sounds. A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound. Pull together everyone in your household and make a plan. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes. Households with children should consider drawing a floor plan of your home, marking two ways out of each room, including windows and doors. Also, mark the location of each smoke alarm. For easy planning, download NFPA's escape planning grid (PDF, 1.1 MB). This is a great way to get children involved in fire safety in a non-threatening way.


Video: Have some fire-safety fun with The Let's Hear It For Fire Safety Kids. They sing and dance about what to do if there's a fire - Get Outside and Stay Outside!

In This Section
Featured Product
Sparky Says: Get to know EDITH Video
Kids are eager to learn about escape planning with the Sparky® Says: Get to know EDITH Video!
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Exit Drills In The Home (E.D.I.T.H.) Brochures
NFPA®'s colorful new E.D.I.T.H. Brochures are ready to teach families how to escape and survive fire!
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