September / October 2011 A Decade of Difference

September 11 and NFPA codes/standards; Sparky the Fire Dog turns 60; Catastrophic multi-death fires in 2010 and the annual Fire Loss in the U.S. report.

FEATURES

A Decade of Difference

A look at how 9/11 shaped the development of some of NFPA’s most important codes and standards - and how that process continues.

Catastrophic Multiple-Death Fire Incidents

A breakdown of all the 2010 multiple-death fires.

Catastrophic Multiple-Death Fires in 2010

Last year, 29 multiple-death fires in the United States killed 175 people, including 30 children.

Fire Loss in the United States During 2010

U.S. fire departments responded to 1,331,500 fires, a decrease of 1.3 percent from the previous year.

It is a Fire Dogs Life

A look at the life of Sparky the Fire Dog®, who turned 60 this year, by his best friend.

Nowhere to Go

Fire safety is a constant concern at Antarctica’s McMurdo Station, a research outpost 830 miles from the South Pole.

P.O.V.

First Word

Learning from sacrifice

Perspectives

Paul Dunphy, code compliance coordinator at Harvard University, on how colleges and universities can demonstrate the value of NFPA 3 for commissioning and integrated testing

News+Analysis

In A Flash

How an underutilized Life Safety Code tool can improve safety at outdoor assembly venues.

Firewatch

Kitchen fire damages restaurant.

Looking Back

The 1930 Ohio prison fire.

Fire Analysis and Research

U.S. Structure Fires in Stores and Other Mercantile Properties.

THE EXPERTS

The 70E Connection

Consider investing in a portable GFCI as part of your PPE arsenal.

Research

Is the teaching of codes and standards redundant or out of date?

Structural Ops

Why you need contingency plans for fires in buildings that are being razed.

Buzzwords

Historic events result in new requirements in NFPA 72®.

Heads Up

Changes to sprinkler systems should not compromise performance.

In Compliance

Elevator lobby egress is an aspect of building safety that can be overlooked.

Outreach

Fire Prevention Week is the longest-running U.S. public safety observance.