AUTHOR: LisaMarie Sinatra

house with lights on

Home Electrical Safety the Focus of NFPA Faces of Fire Electrical Hazard Awareness Campaign Video

As 2021 winter season kicks off and with more households continuing to work and study from home due to the coronavirus pandemic, we must be ever vigilant about home fire safety. This includes understanding the dangers of electricity related to our devices and equipment powered by it. NFPA and the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors have introduced the fifth video interview of their six-part campaign series, Faces of Fire/Electrical, that features the personal story of a woman who, as a young girl, was seriously injured in an house fire, demonstrating the need for continued education and awareness about electrical hazards at home.  In the spring of 1959, then five-year old Pam Elliott suffered third degree burns over 50 percent of her body from a fire ignited by a damaged lighting fixture that destroyed her family home. She spent months during her elementary and high school years undergoing reconstructive surgery to help restore the function of her hands, arms, and legs, and the appearance of her injuries. Equipment and devices powered by electricity as well as faulty structural wiring are potential sources for electrical fires. We all know how much electricity makes our lives easier but today we expect more out of our electrical systems than ever before. This increased need often puts undo burden on these systems, especially in aging homes that are not set up for all our modern equipment and lighting. The Faces of Fire/Electrical campaign reminds us about potential home electrical hazards, how to recognize the warning signs, and the action steps homeowners need to take to reduce associated risks, including contacting a local qualified, licensed electrician who can work with us to find and correct fire safety hazards in our home before a serious incident occurs.  While many electrical injuries prove fatal, those that are not can be particularly debilitating, oftentimes involving complicated recoveries and lasting emotional and physical impact. Today, Pam shares her personal burn story to advocate for home fire sprinklers and home fire safety and she speaks for the most vulnerable people in house fires including infants, children, the elderly, and the disabled. Overall, the Faces of Fire/Electrical campaign works to help build a safer world by teaching others and supporting the burn survivor community in advancing lifelong healing, optimal recovery, and burn and injury prevention. We sincerely thank Pam for sharing her story with us. You can view all of the videos, including the latest interview with Fire Chief Luis Nevarez, from California,  Amy Acton, Chief Executive Officer of the Phoenix Society, and  the first two videos of our series featuring Dave Schury and Sam Matagi, on our dedicated campaign webpage. There you will also find free resources to download and share, including fact sheets, tip sheets, infographics and more, in addition to information about electrical safety in both the home and in the workplace. See Pam’s video and read more about her work by visiting the Faces of Fire/Electrical website at nfpa.org/facesoffire.
Home electrical safety

NFPA Focuses on Home Electrical Safety in the Newest Faces of Fire Electrical Hazard Awareness Campaign Video

With the holidays upon us, coupled with more households working and studying from home due to the coronavirus pandemic, we must be ever vigilant about home fire safety. This includes understanding the dangers of electricity related to our devices and equipment powered by it. NFPA and the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors have introduced the fifth video interview of their six-part campaign series, Faces of Fire/Electrical, that features the personal story of a woman who, as a young girl, was seriously injured in an house fire, demonstrating the need for continued education and awareness about electrical hazards at home.  In the spring of 1959, then five-year old Pam Elliott suffered third degree burns over 50 percent of her body from a fire ignited by a damaged lighting fixture that destroyed her family home. She spent months during her elementary and high school years undergoing reconstructive surgery to help restore the function of her hands, arms, and legs, and the appearance of her injuries. Equipment and devices powered by electricity as well as faulty structural wiring are potential sources for electrical fires. We all know how much electricity makes our lives much easier but today we expect more out of our electrical systems than ever before. This increased need often puts undo burden on these systems, especially in aging homes that are not set up for all our modern equipment and lighting. The Faces of Fire/Electrical campaign reminds us about potential home electrical hazards, how to recognize the warning signs, and the action steps homeowners need to take to reduce associated risks, including contacting a local qualified, licensed electrician who can work with us to find and correct fire safety hazards in our home before a serious incident occurs.  While many electrical injuries prove fatal, those that are not can be particularly debilitating, oftentimes involving complicated recoveries and lasting emotional and physical impact. Today, Pam shares her personal burn story to advocate for home fire sprinklers and home fire safety and she speaks for the most vulnerable people in house fires including infants, children, the elderly, and the disabled. Overall, the Faces of Fire/Electrical campaign works to help build a safer world by teaching others and supporting the burn survivor community in advancing lifelong healing, optimal recovery, and burn and injury prevention. We sincerely thank Pam for sharing her story with us. You can view all of the videos, including the latest interview with Fire Chief Luis Nevarez, from California,  Amy Acton, Chief Executive Officer of the Phoenix Society, and  the first two videos of our series featuring Dave Schury and Sam Matagi, on our dedicated campaign webpage. There you will also find free resources to download and share, including fact sheets, tip sheets, infographics and more, in addition to information about electrical safety in both the home and in the workplace. See Pam’s video and read more about her work by visiting the Faces of Fire/Electrical website at nfpa.org/facesoffire.

NFPA 101, Life Safety Code Newest Addition to NFPA LiNK Digital Reference Tool

With December upon us, NFPA is pleased to announce the addition of the 2021 edition of NFPA 101®, Life Safety Code®, to  NFPA LiNK™, the Association’s new information delivery platform that will include all NFPA codes and standards, supplementary content, and visual aids for building, electrical, and life safety professionals and practitioners. NFPA 101 now joins the four most recent editions of NFPA 70®, National Electrical Code® (NEC®), the most widely used code in the United States, and NFPA 70E®, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace® on the platform. NFPA 101 is the most widely used source for strategies to protect people based on building construction, protection, and occupancy features that minimize the effects of fire and related hazards. NFPA 101 is unique in its field as it’s the only document that covers life safety in both new and existing structures. NFPA LiNK has been designed to provide users with instant access to resources pertinent to their work and requirements for safe work practices that reduce a worker’s exposure to fire, electrical, and other hazards. It can be accessed via mobile devices, tablets, laptops, or other preferred device, and its key functions and features make it easier to find, bookmark, organize, and share information anytime and anywhere. It will become a “living library” for users that offers: The ability to work alongside the codes by adding personal notes, assigning colors, and saving to custom collections for quick and easy reference A broader understanding of code requirements through access to expert commentary, visual aids, and helpful resources Collaboration features to share code sections, work across teams, and ensure everyone knows what is required Navigation tools that enable users to quickly locate the information they need based on the situations they encounter Interested in learning more? Check out the newest demonstration video that gives you a quick glance into many of those key functions and features of the tool. You can also get more information about the NFPA LiNK platform, including how to sign up for a free trial, a timeline of additional codes and standards that will be coming to NFPA LiNK, and a product introduction video. Find everything you need today at nfpa.org/LiNK.  
Fire truck racing down the street

Firefighter safety the spotlight of latest video interview for Faces of Fire electrical hazard awareness campaign

This fall, NFPA and the Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors announced the launch of a new campaign series, Faces of Fire/Electrical, which features personal stories of people impacted by electrical incidents, demonstrating the need for continued education and awareness about electrical hazards in the workplace and at home. Over the course of the campaign we are highlighting a new video interview every few weeks. This week, we introduce Luis Nevarez, a division chief in the City of Tulare Fire Department in California. While responding to a call as a firefighter in 2002, Luis accidentally touched a hidden 12,000-volt line while breaking a limb off a smoldering tree. The incident caused severe burn injuries, which resulted in the amputation of his left forearm. Luis spent 35 days in the hospital following his accident, and months recovering from his injuries.  According to the latest U.S. Firefighter Injury Report from NFPA, an estimated 58,250 firefighter injuries occurred in the line of duty in 2018, and while the majority of firefighter injuries are minor, a significant number are often debilitating and career ending. When it comes to electrical dangers, many believe they exist only at vehicle accidents or structure fires, but the truth is, electrical lines can present safety risks in nearly every fire and emergency situation. The warning signs, however, are not always visible to allow firefighters to recognize the dangers. Luis’ story is powerful and today he continues to advocate for a safe work environment for members of the fire service. Systemic change, including training and education about the electrical hazards firefighters face while on call is essential. If firefighters and first responders are better equipped to identify the warnings early, they can reduce their risk of injuries from electricity, including treating all electrical lines and components as live until they are deemed safe. We are grateful to Luis for sharing his story with us. You can view all of the videos, including the latest interview with Amy Acton, Chief Executive Officer of the Phoenix Society, and the first two videos of our series featuring Dave Schury and Sam Matagi, on our dedicated campaign webpage. There you will also find free resources to download and share, including fact sheets, tip sheets, infographics and more, in addition to information about electrical safety in both the home and in the workplace. See Luis’ video and read more about his work by visiting the Faces of Fire/Electrical website at nfpa.org/facesoffire

New Addition to NFPA LiNK Digital Reference Tool: NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace

NFPA has announced the 2021 edition of NFPA 70E®, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace® as the latest addition to  NFPA LiNK™, the Association's new information delivery platform that will include codes and standards, supplementary content, and visual aids for building, electrical, and life safety professionals and practitioners. Originally developed at OSHA's request, NFPA 70E helps companies and employees avoid workplace injuries and fatalities due to shock, electrocution, arc flash, and arc blast. With the addition of NFPA 70E to NFPA LiNK, users have instant access to requirements for safe work practices that reduce a worker's exposure to major electrical hazards. In September, NFPA introduced the platform with the four most recent editions of NFPA 70®, National Electrical Code® (NEC®), the most widely used code in the United States and referenced around the globe. One of the great aspects of NFPA LiNK is that it can be accessed via mobile devices, tablets, laptops, or other preferred device. It will become a “living library” for users that offers: The ability to work alongside the NEC and NFPA 70E by adding personal notes, assigning colors, and saving to custom collections for quick and easy reference A broader understanding of code requirements through access to expert commentary, visual aids, and helpful resources Collaboration features to share code sections, work across teams, and ensure everyone knows what is required Navigation tools that enable users to quickly locate the information they need based on the situations they encounter There's so much more about NFPA LiNK you don't want to miss! Check out the NFPA LiNK weekly “video blog series” where we break down and discuss some of the key features and functionalities of the platform. Our first video in the series highlights the Dashboard and publications functions. In the second installation, we discuss Bookmarks and the MyLiNK features. The latest video features situational navigation. As an NFPA LiNK subscriber, you will get access to continuous updates, features and functions, and new editions of NFPA codes and standards as they are released. NFPA will soon expand the collection of codes and standards within the application to include the more than 300 that NFPA offers. Learn more about how NFPA LiNK can help you in your work. Find more information about the platform, a timeline of additional codes and standards that will be coming to NFPA LiNK, and a product introduction video all at nfpa.org/LiNK. Purchase or try NFPA LiNK by visiting the website.  
Draper Utah FD FPW Project - Photo - October 2020

Local Utah Fire Department Service Project Reminds Us About the Value of Collaboration and the Importance of Safety During Fire Prevention Week and Beyond

Earlier this month, NFPA learned about a local service project that embodies the true spirit of collaboration as it relates to fire and life safety. The story takes place in Draper, Utah where the Draper Fire Department was recently asked by the Grossinger family to help with a wildfire mitigation project around their home. According to local news reports, as the department began working, they noticed something amiss: the home's sprinkler and smoke alarm systems needed updating. But this was not a typical upgrade – it was something a bit more special because the parents and the older daughter in the family are deaf and have been reliant on their younger son who can hear, to alert them when the smoke alarms sounded or if there was a fire in the home. Recognizing the seriousness of the situation, the Draper Fire Department immediately reached out to area partners who agreed to provide special smoke alarms that visually flash to alert deaf occupants, and to work on repairing and updating the home's residential fire sprinklers. Soon after the initial contact from the fire department, the companies began work in the home. The service project was organized as part of NFPA's National Fire Prevention Week(FPW), which ran from October 4 – 10. According to Draper fire officials, the project was intended not only to serve as a reminder for other homeowners to review their own fire safety measures during the week of the campaign, but to do so all year long. As part of the project, the department provided information and tips related to this year's FPW campaign theme, “Serving Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” to help raise awareness of the common causes of home cooking fires and ways to prevent them. The story of the Grossinger Family is a heartening one, and one that reminds us that the work we do for Fire Prevention Week is important to the security and well- being of communities everywhere. As fire safety advocates, it is crucial that all of us recognize and take full advantage of the campaign not just in October but throughout the year. Thanks to the hard work of the Draper Fire Department and their partners, individuals and families in Utah and beyond are inspired to become their own advocates for, and embrace their personal role in, this important system of safety. Learn more about the Fire Prevention Week campaign, and get tips and resources to help keep your family safe from fire by visiting NFPA's Public Education website. Photo: Mark Grossinger (left), Don Buckley, Fire Marshal – Draper City Fire Department (Utah) (center), and Brooke Grossinger (right); photo courtesy of theDraper Fire Department.
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