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Fireworks

Fireworks education remains a priority all summer long

NFPA’s stance on fireworks is clear and to the point – “Leave fireworks in the hands of the professionals.” Whether or not your state/province allows the use of consumer fireworks, fireworks pose too significant a risk to use them “safely.” Many people will ask, “but what about Sparklers – they’re safe aren’t they?”  And the qualified answer is “No.” Consider that water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius), and that Sparklers reach nearly six times that - 1200 degrees Fahrenheit (649 degrees C)! A new report from fireworks-related incidents in 2020, compared to 2019. Highlights from this 2020 special report include: At least 18 people died from fireworks-related incidents in 2020, compared to 12 reported for the previous year. About 15,600 people were treated in hospital emergency departments for fireworks injuries in 2020. There were about 10,000 ER-treated fireworks injuries in 2019. Firecrackers were the biggest source of Emergency Room treated fireworks injuries (1,600) followed by sparklers (900). Approximately 75 percent of the victims were treated at the hospital emergency department and then released. An estimated 21 percent of patients were treated and transferred to another hospital or admitted to the hospital. What does that mean for 2021?  As the month of July wraps up, it is important for Fire & Life Safety (FLS) educators to continue to educate on the dangers of consumer fireworks and promote alternatives that are safe and fun to enjoy the summer months that won’t cause burns, injuries, and trips to the hospital. NFPA’s Fireworks Safety Education page contains infographics, social media cards, videos, and relevant messaging to support your fire and burn prevention efforts and promote safe and healthy communities. Follow me on Twitter @AndreaVastis and NFPA on Twitter,  Facebook, and Instagram to keep up with the latest from the Public Education Division.

There’s a lot to learn from our peers for how to have a successful Fire Prevention Week!

Join us for the free Fire Prevention Week (FPW):  Kickstart your 2021 campaign! Webinar, Thursday, July 29th from 2:00 – 3:15 p.m. Eastern Time to learn all about this year’s FPW theme “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety” and how you can engage your community in fire & burn prevention.  Learn from the experts – your peers in Fire & Life Safety (FLS) education - the keys to a great social media campaign, and how you can plan for transitioning back to in person/hybrid learning. Get updates on smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarm technology, proper messaging, free resources, and how to assure inclusion of people who are deaf and hard of hearing into this year’s FPW efforts. The webinar features: Andrea Vastis and Kelly Ransdell with NFPA Monica Colby, Fire & Life Safety Educator, Rapid City Fire Department, SD Brene Duggins, Fire Prevention Coordinator, Holly Grove, NC Fire Department and media coordinator of the Oak Grove High School in Davidson County, NC Ashley Rodrigue, Public Affairs Director, Louisiana State Fire Marshal's Office This year’s FPW campaign, “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety!” works to educate people about the different sounds the smoke and carbon monoxide alarms make and to insure they know what to do when an alarm makes a “chirp,” or alarm sound.  Check out www.fpw.org to download our toolkit with pre-formatted social media cards, innovative ideas, FPW logos, and so much more! Register Today! for this valuable, free webinar to support your Fire Prevention Week efforts! Follow me on Twitter @AndreaVastis and NFPA on Twitter,  Facebook, and Instagram to keep up with the latest from the Public Education Division.
Sparky and woman in her home with pizza

Partner with NFPA and Domino’s to promote smoke alarm safety during Fire Prevention Week

NFPA and Domino’s are teaming up for the 14th year in a row to deliver fire safety messages and pizza during Fire Prevention Week™ (FPW), October 3 -9, 2021. To make this year’s campaign a success, we’re encouraging fire departments to join forces with their local Domino’s store to implement the campaign in their communities. Here’s how the program works: Partner with your local Domino’s store to participate in an easy-to-execute program that will promote fire safety during FPW. Select a day and time period (usually 2-3 hours) to randomly choose one to three pizza orders to deliver aboard a fire engine. The participating Domino’s delivery expert will follow the fire engine in his or her car. When the pizza delivery arrives, the firefighters will check the home for working smoke alarms. If the smoke alarms work, the customer’s order is free (cost absorbed by the Domino’s store). If the smoke alarms aren’t working, the fire department will replace the batteries or install fully functioning smoke alarms (cost absorbed by the fire department). As you’ve likely heard by now, this year’s FPW campaign theme is “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety™.” It works to educate everyone about the sounds smoke alarms make, what those sounds mean, and how to respond to them. Partnering with Domino’s presents a fun and powerful way to reinforce this messaging. Domino’s Fire Prevention Week Sweepstakes Fire departments that sign up (from August 12-30) to participate in this program will automatically be entered into Domino’s FPW Sweepstakes. Domino’s will randomly select three winners who will receive the NFPA’s “Fire Prevention Week in a Box 300” which includes: FPW news booklets Kids' activity booklets Magnets Stickers Brochures Posters Banners Two-sided goodie bags Sign up to participate If your fire department would like to participate in the NFPA and Domino’s FPW program, please email Chantele Telegadas. Signup emails that are sent August 12-30 will be entered into the Sweepstakes. The FPW Sweepstakes winners will be drawn on or around Monday, September 9.
A firefighter a child

Get a jump on your Fire Prevention Week planning with this free webinar

What are your plans for Fire Prevention Week™ this year? Join us for the free Fire Prevention Week Webinar: Kickstart your 2021 campaign! Thursday, July 29th from 2 – 3:15 pm Eastern Time to learn all about this year’s FPW theme and how you can engage your community in fire & burn prevention.  This webinar offers insights into our free resources, keys to a great social media campaign, and how you can plan for transitioning back to in person/hybrid learning. Get key updates on smoke and CO alarm technology, proper messaging, and learn new ideas on how to reach the deaf and hard of hearing community with this year’s key messages. Featured speakers: Andrea Vastis and Kelly Ransdell with NFPA Monica Colby, Fire & Life Safety Educator, Rapid City Fire Department, SD Brene Duggins, Fire Prevention Coordinator, Holly Grove, NC Fire Department and media coordinator of the Oak Grove High School in Davidson County, NC Ashley Rodrigue, Public Affairs Director, Louisiana State Fire Marshal's Office This year’s FPW campaign, “Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety!” works to educate people about the different sounds the smoke and carbon monoxide alarms make and to insure they know what to do when an alarm makes a “chirp,” or alarm sound. This webinar will be recorded and available on the Fire Prevention Week site on which you can access our FPW toolkit, catalog, and resources for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Register today to kickstart your Fire Prevention Week efforts! Follow me on Twitter @AndreaVastis and NFPA on Twitter,  Facebook, and Instagram to keep up with the latest from the Public Education Division.
Woman testing a smoke alarm

Use these resources to activate Fire Prevention Week in your community

“Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety,” the theme to this year’s Fire Prevention Week™, taps into the recent phenomenon of alarm notifications (such as the “chirp” of a low battery/end of life signal of a smoke or carbon monoxide alarm) being heard in the background of people’s homes during remote learning and work. Too often, that “chirping” becomes white noise or is misunderstood as a malfunction of the alarm, leading people to ignore or remove the alarm altogether. As the oldest continuously running U.S. public health observance, Fire Prevention Week (FPW) is a great way to activate fire & burn prevention efforts in your community, bringing critical information and resources to your residents.  Start with our Fire Prevention Week theme video to learn the key messages of the campaign. Next, go to www.firepreventionweek.org for a multitude of resources, from the FPW toolkit, containing social media assets and free downloads, to information for specific populations such as caregivers of older adults and people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Education and programs promoting the need for, and understanding of, smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms is still critical in fire and burn prevention education. Almost three of every five home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms (41%) or no working smoke alarms (16%).  The number of fatalities in the US attributed to CO poisoning has remained fairly consistent from 1999-2018 averaging 1.3 deaths per million population, with 435 such deaths occurring in 2018. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), generators are the leading product involved in CO incidents, followed by heating equipment. NFPA is here to help you kick off your Fire Prevention Week efforts, to share lifesaving information, resources and programs with your communities. Follow me on Twitter @AndreaVastis and NFPA on Twitter,  Facebook, and Instagram to keep up with the latest from the Public Education Division.
Two men looking at a map

The more local you can get when conducting CRR, the better

Community data is extremely valuable in identifying risks within a specific area, but when it comes to effective community risk reduction (CRR), the more local you can get, the better. In many cases, practitioners have found drastically different risk profiles within a given city, with significant variation existing from station to station and neighborhood to neighborhood. These variables need to be carefully considered when assessing and prioritizing risk. For some fire departments, however, this approach can prove challenging, particularly for those that prefer or are more used to implementing CRR from a single, over-arching perspective. On Tuesday, July 20, NFPA is hosting “Drilling Down for Success: Applying a Hyperlocal Approach to Community Risk Reduction,” a one-hour session that discusses the value of a hyperlocal CRR, reinforcing the benefits of a station-based approach over a more generalized one. A particular benefit of this strategy includes increased engagement from firefighters whose efforts can be more focused on the immediate needs of the area and directly see the impact of their efforts. During this presentation, Chief Deanna Harrington from Arvada, Colorado and Chief Larry Cocco from Toronto, Ontario will discuss their innovative approaches to neighborhood-focused CRR, providing strategies around station-based community risk assessments, station-based risk prioritization, and implementation of hyperlocal CRR plans. In addition to unpacking the challenges of this approach, positive outcomes of both chiefs’ work will be covered, including improved relevancy, greater impact, and increased engagement across fire service personnel. This session is part of “Community Risk Reduction: Insights to Action,” a full-day program offering in-depth educational sessions, networking events, live chats with CRR experts, and an exciting announcement from NFPA. The program is part of the association’s virtual 125th Anniversary Conference Series, which replaces the traditional in-person 2021 NFPA Conference & Expo and runs from May 2021 through March 2022. Register for “Community Risk Reduction: Insights to Action” today! At $98, all 10 hours of educational sessions and resources can be viewed live on July 20 or accessed on-demand for one full year.
People of diversity

When it comes to community safety, equitable approaches can help boost impact

In recent years, as the public has become increasingly aware of the inequities that exist across communities, leaders are working to ensure that equitable practices exist, so that all residents are seen, heard, and respected. It goes without saying that ensuring equity is a critical effort in itself. But in prevention work, equity also leads to efficiency. Putting it another way, applying resources where they are likely to have the biggest impact is an effective strategy for getting maximum results. Some initiatives rooted in tradition call for equal distribution of resources throughout the community. This, for example, would be making sure every second grader across the district receives the same fire safety program. However, the idea behind equitable efforts is that applying added energy and resources to those who need it most is a more impactful approach. Of course, understanding this in theory is one thing. Putting it into practice is another. On Tuesday, July 20, NFPA is hosting “Driving Community Safety in a Modern World: Equity, Efficiency, & Impact,” a 75-minute session that addresses the concept of equity, exploring how it impacts community safety. Meghan Housewright, director NFPA Fire & Life Safety Institute; Lauri Volkert, fire inspector, Windsor, CT; and Lt. Katie Harrington, FLSE, Worcester, MA will be the presenters, sharing strategies that highlight the roles of both equal and equitable resource deployment, the importance of risk-to-resource matching, and the need to recognize community strengths and challenges when planning prevention initiatives. This session is part of “Community Risk Reduction: Insights to Action,” a full-day program offering in-depth educational sessions, networking events, live chats with CRR experts, and an exciting announcement from NFPA. The program is part of the association’s virtual , which replaces the traditional in-person 2021 NFPA Conference & Expo and runs from May 2021 through March 2022. Register for “Community Risk Reduction: Insights to Action” today! At $98, all 10 hours of educational sessions and resources can be viewed live on July 20 or accessed on-demand for one full year.  From now through July 6, when you register, use the code EARLYBIRD125 to invite a friend for free!
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